New Book: Provincial Headz: British Hip Hop and Critical Regionalism

PROVINCIAL HEADZ: British Hip Hop and Critical Regionalism is a new
book by Adam de Paor-Evans, which reveals the evolution of hip hop in the
regional-rural areas of Britain during the 1980s, and draws upon spatial practice,
(auto)ethnomusicology, material culture, and cultural theory to present a
counter-narrative to that of hip hop as strictly urban. The book provides insight
into the relocation of hip hop culture from its inception in New York to its
practices in provincial and rural Britain. Provincial Headz reveals parallel and
dialectical experiences of British hip hop pioneers and practitioners dwelling
outside the metropolis, and serves as an introduction to the complexities of its
historical narratives in Britain, and how we might understand these narratives as a
valuable part of global-glocal hip hop history.

Avalible from all good bookshops, online book stories and direct from the publisher at an online discount using the code: Headz.

Call for Panelists: The Politics of Language in African HipHop, ASAUK, U Cardiff, 8-10 Sept. 2020

Convenor: Msia Kibona Clarke (Howard)

The question of language in African literature was debated in the 1960s and 1970s. At the heart of the debate was: who qualifies as being an African writer? and what qualifies as African literature? African authors like Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Chinua Achebe weighed in on different sides of the debate. Today a similar debate is occurring in various hip-hop communities in Africa. Similar questions have emerged: What are the qualifications for being classified as an African MC? and what qualifies as African hip-hop?

Similar to the debate over African literature, the debate over language and hip-hop in Africa is rooted in the relationship between Europe (and now the United States) and Africa. Some artists choose to perform in English, either to reach a bigger audience, or because that are more fluent in English. Some artists have advocated for artists performing in African languages. Even those that are fluent in European languages may choose to rap in an African language. There are also MCs all over Africa who mixlanguages. African artists often draw from different language pools to write their rhymes. In the context of Africa, MCs will often write lyrics that include a European language and/or multiple African languages.

The papers in this panel will explore the language debate in hip hop in Africa, and seeks to investigate questions around the importance of language in hip hop in Africa, the privileging of European languages over African languages, the relevance of audience reach and marketability in language choice, and how the language debate reflect the relationships Africans have with both African and European languages.

Deadline

The deadline for submission to the conference programme (organised sessions, book launch requests and roundtable meetings) is Sunday 22 March 2020.

Details on how to submit a paper can be found here: http://www.asauk.net/asauk-2020/call-for-papers-and-panels

Call for Papers: Transcultural Hip-Hop, U Bern, Switzerland, 30-31 Oct 2020

Transcultural Hip-Hop: Constructing and Contesting Identity, Space, and Place
in the Americas and beyond

Update 11 March 2020: The deadline for the Call for Papers has been extended until 27 March 2020.

Almost fifty years after its birth, hip-hop is considered a truly global phenomenon that
combines elements of uniformity with local symbols and expressions regarding musical
forms, lyrics, performances, and social content. It can be said that within the US context, hip-hop emerged during the 1970s as an African American subculture. However, from its very beginning hip-hop has been a highly transcultural and hybrid phenomenon that integrates various musical elements and forms of cultural expression. In addition to African American popular culture, for example, Caribbean and Latin American music styles, language and dance played a vital role in the formation and development of hip-hop on both coasts of the US. The entanglement of diverse cultures and diasporas on the evolution of hip-hop as a music and as a movement, in the urban settings of New York and Los Angeles, for example, encourages us to think of these different musical, cultural, and social traits in more fluid or hybrid terms. Furthermore, diasporic identity in the multicultural neighborhoods where hip-hop first emerged is also fluid concerning the interaction between diasporic “peripheries” and their centers of origin. This conference aims to focus on the transcultural, inter-ethnic and diasporic exchanges that created hip-hop and helped to spread it within the US and beyond. The conference asks how identity markers bound by ethnic, cultural, and spatial categories are being negotiated in hip-hop. While concentrating on the Americas, the conference will also include papers that focus on other world regions and on transregional entanglements.

Within the framework of transculturality, the organizers wish to focus on three principal
areas of enquiry:

A. Identity Politics in Hip-Hop
In the context of US hip-hop, many scholars argue that hip-hop should be understood with regard to its African American “centrality” (Ogbar 2007; Perry 2004). While this is not disputed by the conference organizers per se, we ask how can we better understand the hybridity of hip-hop music and culture, both at its point of origin, and as a global phenomenon? Furthermore, how do other minority groups and diasporas draw upon ´African American´ cultural markers to legitimate their contributions to the genre? How do local and global hip-hop movements reproduce and adapt such identity markers to different social and political contexts and agendas? In doing so, notions of identity and authenticity are contested and broadened over time.

B. Movement, Reproduction and Hybridity of Cultural Signifiers in Hip-Hop
Following on from these themes and borrowing from Appadurai’s (1996) understanding of cultural flows or ‘scapes’ in an era of globalization, one way of understanding the myriad creations of hybrid identity constructions in hip-hop is to identify and unpack the
reproduction and merging of cultural signifiers, be they musical, visual, linguistic or
otherwise. Which cultural symbols are (re-)produced in a particular context, and how do
local or national cultural forms interact with transnational and global cultural flows? How
does cultural politics shape the negotiation of cultural signifiers? Finally, for minority
groups establishing themselves in different diasporic contexts, what is their relationship
with their home or national culture from afar, and how do they shape the transcultural
dynamics of centers of hip-hop production?

C. Space & Place in Hip-Hop
Like no other musical genre, hip-hop reflects a unique importance of space and identity
(Rose 1994; Forman 2002). From its very inception in New York City, representing one’s
neighborhood at battles was a central part of hip-hop culture. When Los Angeles became the center of gangster rap in the late 1980s, African American and Latino rap artists highlighted the intermingling of hip-hop with gang culture on the West Coast. The East Coast/West Coast feud in the mid-1990s, culminating in the deaths of Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls, pointed to the collision of geographical and musical spaces when negotiating spatial identities and affiliations. Thus, in its myriad forms and expressions in the US and around the globe, hip-hop’s “powerful ties to place” (Forman 2002) are omnipresent and reflected by artist names, languages and local slang as well as references to specific geographical markers and signature musical styles of a particular locality. How are common issues of marginalization and contested localities being negotiated in hiphop? What can these place-identities tell us about the political, socio-geographic and cultural context hip-hop culture is produced in?

The conference will be held in English and prospective participants should please send a title and abstract of up to 300 words to keith.cann@hist.unibe.ch by March 15, 2020.
Travel and accommodation costs will be covered thanks to funding from the Swiss National Science Foundation.

SNF Project Hip Hop as a transcultural phenomenon: https://www.hist.unibe.ch/forschung/forschungsprojekte/hip_hop_as_a_transcultural_phenomenon/new_york/index_ger.html

Call for Poster Presentations: Center For The Interdisciplinary Pursuit of Hip Hop Elevation & Research (CIPHER) Inaugural Conference, California State U, USA, 1 May 2020

From its outset, Hip-hop has been a global phenomenon. The music translated without translation. It spoke and speaks to and for many. This inaugural conference raises questions and promotes discussion not about the impact of hip-hop but about its capacity to build community at local, national, and global levels. It is examined at political, social, commercial, and artistic vantage points. 

Submit a Poster Abstract

  • Submissions must be related to Hip-hop. All elements of Hip-hop are eligible.
  • Poster abstracts must be submitted online using the Conference Poster Submission Form.
  • Please review the CIPHER Conference Poster Submission Guidelines.
  • Abstracts accepted for Poster Presentation will automatically be entered in the CIPHER Conference Poster Presentation Award competition. Certificates are awarded to the top three in each division, High School, Undergraduate and Graduate.
  • The deadline is April 1st, 2020 for all divisions (high school student, undergraduate student, graduate student). Acceptances will be sent starting April 2nd.
  • The CSUN Campus the poster session will be held in the Lakeview Terrace room in the University Student Union (USU) building.
  • *Accepted poster presentations receive 50% off Conference fee

Date and Place

The conference date is May 1, 2020 on the CSUN Campus California State University Northridge (Los Angeles).

Costs

  •   College Students           $40
  •   High School Students   $25
  •   All others                        $50
  •   *Accepted poster presentations receive 50% off Conference fee             

Contact

For more information email: cipher@csun.edu.

Accommodations for Guests with Disabilities

Communication Services (sign language interpreters, note takers, transcribers) are available for these events. Requests for services must be submitted at least five (5) days in advance. Please contact CSBSEvents@csun.edu or call (818) 677-3317.

New Monograph: Provincial Headz: British Hip Hop and Critical Regionalism

Provincial Headz: British Hip Hop and Critical Regionalism is a new book by Adam de Paor-Evans, which reveals the evolution of hip hop in the regional-rural areas of Britain during the 1980s, and draws upon spatial practice, (auto)ethnomusicology, material culture, and cultural theory to present a counter-narrative to that of hip hop as strictly urban. The book provides insight into the relocation of hip hop culture from its inception in New York to its practices in provincial and rural Britain. Provincial Headz reveals parallel and dialectical experiences of British hip hop pioneers and practitioners dwelling outside the metropolis, and serves as an introduction to the complexities of its historical narratives in Britain, and how we might understand these narratives as a valuable part of global-glocal hip hop history.

Provincial Headz: British Hip Hop and Critical Regionalism draws upon spatial practice, material culture, human geography, ethnomusicology and cultural theory in order to present an interdisciplinary counter-narrative to that of hip hop as a strictly urban phenomenon.

Congratulations, Adam, for publishing the book!

Save the Date! 3rd Meeting of the European HipHop Studies Network, Rotterdam, 12-13 September 2020

We are very excited to announce that the third meeting of the European HipHop Studies Network will take place from 12-13 September 2020 in Rotterdam, NL for the first time. Claudia Marinelli and her team from the National Centre of Expertise for Cultural Education and Amateur Arts will organize the meeting in cooperation with the Da Bounce Urban Lifestyle Festival in Rotterdam. We will publish the Call for Sessions in April. If you have any questions in the meantime, please email us.

Register for our newsletter, mark your calendars, and stay tuned for more updates!

4ESYDNEY – The Home of HIPHOP: Festival, Conference and Mentoring Program, 21 March – 4 April 2020, Sydney, Australia

4ESydney is the only festival and project of its kind, specialising in HipHop culture and multi artform, interdisciplinary practice. It acts as a meeting ground, a space where community, industry and education meet, to create unique opportunities for the growth and preservation of HipHop culture, professional development and industry sustainability. For the community, by the community, 4ESydney, now heading into its 6th year, continues to gradually build a global infrastructure and platform for HipHop in Australia.

Conference (1-4 April 2020)

4ESydney opens the floor to having honest uncensored dialogue, putting the HipHop scene and creative industries under the microscope, dissecting and analysing what is really going on, finding new ways to make it healthier and more sustainable. It’s all about the power and exchange of knowledge, of culture, of history and sharing experiences which have impacted our lives. It doesn’t matter who you are, how old you are or where you are from, we all hold knowledge and experiences which allow us to be both teacher and student.

The conference is led by industry professionals, artists, academics, community and HipHop pioneers, and structured to be interactive with a combination of discussions, roundtables, workshops, networking events and more.

Join us as we explore the bright lights and dark nights of the forever growing HipHop culture which is driving youth-led movements around the world.

2020 Key Themes

  • 1. MENTAL HEALTH
  • 2. GENDER
  • 3. RACE
  • 4. YOUTH ENGAGEMENT & EDUCATION
  • 5. ACTIVISM & GLOBAL IMPACT
  • 6. FIRST PEOPLES LEADERSHIP
  • 7. INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT

Festival and Conference Details:

  • Conference website
  • Contact information: vyvienne@vyvaentertainment.com
  • Conference costs: approx. 115 Australian dollars